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left_flag Thursday, January 19
Thursday, January 19, 2017

On the show today, Kerby chats with Charlie Spencer and Michael Stewart from Inspiration Cruises, they tell us about their company and about the Point of View cruise to Alaska.

In the second hour Kerby welcomes into the studio, author John Dwyer and nationally-syndicated columnist William Murchison. They will chat about the importance in the American culture wars of writing (and reading) trustworthy histories, and encouraging the rising up of others to write other state and national histories.

Kerby Anderson
Kerby Anderson
Point of View Radio Talk Show Host

Kerby Anderson has more than 30 years of experience in ministry and currently serves as the President of Probe Ministries as well as Host of Point of View Radio Talk Show. He graduated from Oregon State University and holds masters degrees from Yale University (science) and Georgetown University (government). He is the author of thirteen books including Signs of Warning…

Guests
Charlie Spencer
Christian Cruise Director - Inspiration Cruises
Charlie Spencer's 17 years of industry experience have made him more passionate about cruising.
Michael Stewart
Vice President - Inspiration Cruises
Michael Stewart is the vice president of Inspiration Cruises. He has a Bachelor of Science (BS) from Liberty University.
John Dwyer
Author
John began a career in journalism during his high school days when he served in a variety of roles, including news and sports reporter, for the Duncan Banner, a daily newspaper in his small Oklahoma hometown. He was the youngest sports editor in the newspaper's history by the time he attended the University of Oklahoma on a journalism scholarship. He graduated in 1978 with a bachelor of arts and sciences degree in journalism.

Dwyer further developed his journalistic skills in radio as a play‐by‐play football and basketball announcer for several radio stations. He won the coveted position of sports director for the University of Oklahoma's 100,000 watt KGOU‐FM radio station. For seven years, he provided live, on‐air reports to America's largest radio networks of University of Oklahoma college football games.

Except for a year in England during 6th grade, John lived in the Sooner State for 28 years before returning to Dallas in 1986 to attend Dallas Theological Seminary where he earned his Master of Biblical Studies. While there, Dwyer worked part time on the sports staff of The Dallas Times Herald, which at the time owned one of the five largest circulations of any daily newspaper in Texas. It was in Texas that he also met and married his wife Grace in 1988 and settled down to start his family.
The Oklahomans: The Story of Oklahoma and Its People Vol.1
The unforgettable saga of America's last frontier-the Oklahoma Country. Never has the story of this great land and people been told like John J. Dwyer does it. Storybook, history book, coffee table book. Featuring the same colorful and readable format that has helped make his "The War Between the States: America's Uncivil War" a success, "The Oklahomans (Volume 1, Ancient-Statehood)," chronicles the saga of the winning-and losing-of a land. Some of the most famous cowboys, Indians, lawmen, outlaws, and explorers in American history stride across the pages of this unforgettable story. So do some of the country's greatest entrepreneurs, statesmen, Christian ministers, social pioneers, and athletes.
William Murchison
Nationally-syndicated columnist
A seventh-generation Texan, Murchison (commonly known as Bill) was graduated from the University of Texas in 1963 and received a master of arts degree from Stanford University in 1964. Besides There’s More to Life Than Politics, he has published Reclaiming Morality in America, with foreword by Bill Bennett. The book he has just finished, on the crisis in the Episcopal Church, will appear in 2007.

His writings are found in publications like the Wall Street Journal, the Weekly Standard, Human Life Review, First Things, Touchstone, and National Review. His syndicated column, distributed by Creators since the ‘90s, began in 1981.

Married for 32 years, the Murchisons live in Dallas, in a saltbox house designed (and partly executed) by Nancy Murchison. The once-a-week commute to Waco takes less than two hours. The Murchisons have two grown sons and one new daughter-in-law, as well as a taste for wine, opera, and Texas art. They participate actively in community affairs and in the life of their Episcopal parish and diocese..
Trump Inauguration Protests
Leaders of an ad hoc group of protesters enraged by Republican Donald Trump's election as president of the United States vowed on Wednesday to disrupt his inauguration this week by blocking public access to the event.

The DisruptJ20 protest group said it will send groups of demonstrators to the dozen entrances to the grassy National Mall where hundreds of thousands of people are expected to gather to watch Trump, who has never before held public office, be sworn in as president on the steps of the U.S. Capitol on Friday.

"We believe that it's our role and the role of any people with conscience to try to disrupt this inauguration and have a massive showing of resistance on that day," Samantha Miller, a DisruptJ20 organizer, said at a news conference.
Why Unity is Elusive
The presidency has become the biggest prize in the culture war, and that doesn’t lead to unity. ‘For many years,” Donald Trump tweeted Sunday afternoon, “our country has been divided, angry and untrusting. Many say it will never change, the hatred is too deep. IT WILL CHANGE!!!!” As persuasive as the ALL CAPS are, I have my doubts.

Put aside Trump’s specific shortcomings for the moment. The presidency has become ill-suited to the task of unifying the country, because the presidency has become the biggest prize and totem in the culture war. Like the religious wars between Catholics and Protestants in England, if one side controls the throne, it is seen as an insult and threat to the other. And whoever holds the throne is seen as a kind of personal Protector of the Realm.

John Dwyer’s Oklahomans
Perhaps no state has a more interesting and diverse history than does Oklahoma, and John Dwyer has expertly conveyed this fact in the first volume of an envisioned two-volume work on the “Sooner State.” To be blunt, in the past many authors of survey histories of the state have produced books on Oklahoma history that are about as dry as the dust from the multiple cattle drives that crossed the state in the last part of the 19th century. These writers have at times appeared almost disinterested in their subject, and have presented the material in an almost condescending, even apologetic manner.

You don’t get that from Dwyer. Instead, one can quickly discern that he is devoted to his home state. At the same time, the book does not avoid those parts of Oklahoma’s checkered history that are a vivid testimony to the flawed nature of human beings. Instead, he tackles such topics in a way that provides the perspective that is usually missing from other treatments of difficult topics, such as segregation, the Indian removals, corruption in government, and private-sector injustices.