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Friday, March 10, 2017

Our Weekend Edition shows are a great end to the week. Today Kerby, Penna Dexter and Kelly Shackelford take a look at the top stories in the news this week and give you their point of view, we would love to hear yours, so please give us a call in-studio at 800-351-1212.

Kerby Anderson
Kerby Anderson
Point of View Radio Talk Show Host

Kerby Anderson has more than 30 years of experience in ministry and currently serves as the President of Probe Ministries as well as Host of Point of View Radio Talk Show. He graduated from Oregon State University and holds masters degrees from Yale University (science) and Georgetown University (government). He is the author of thirteen books including Signs of Warning…

Guests
Penna Dexter
Penna Dexter
Co-Host - Point of View Radio Talk Show
Penna Dexter is a radio commentator and columnist for various Christian conservative outlets. She is a frequent commentator and guest host for Point of View Radio Talk Show with Kerby Anderson. Her weekly commentaries air on the Moody Broadcasting Network and the Bott Radio Network. Penna’s columns appear at Baptist Press and the Christian Post blog page. Penna is an executive at Todd Dexter & Associates, the integrated marketing consulting company founded by her husband, Todd Dexter.

For eight years she served as Marlin Maddoux’s co-host on Point of View and for two years she co-hosted a daily drive time live broadcast on the Dallas-based Criswell Radio Network.

Penna’s interest in conservative politics and the issues that affect the family began when she was a child working on political campaigns with her parents. She graduated from the University of Southern California with a degree in International Relations. She spent 8 years in the banking industry. She and her husband Todd have three children who are in their twenties. They are members of Trinity Presbyterian Church.
Kelly Shackelford
Kelly Shackelford
President and CEO - First Liberty Institute
Mr. Shackelford is a constitutional scholar who has argued before the United States Supreme Court, testified before the U.S. House and Senate on constitutional issues, and has won three state landmark First Amendment and religious liberty cases in the past few years alone. He was recently named one of the 25 greatest Texas lawyers of the past quarter century by Texas Lawyer, and is the recipient of the prestigious William Bentley Ball Award for Life and Religious Freedom Defense for his leadership and pioneering work protecting religious freedom.
The Klein Baker Case
First Liberty clients Aaron and Melissa Klein went before the Oregon Court of Appeals for oral arguments on Thursday, March 2. Former owners of a family bakery, “Sweet Cakes by Melissa,” the couple was penalized by the Oregon government when they declined to create a custom cake for a same-sex wedding on grounds that it would violate their faith. With First Liberty’s help, they’re fighting for the right to run their business according to their faith.

Here are five facts about this case you should know:
Credibility of Those Opposing Healthcare Bill
Liberals and their allies in the mainstream media are getting a lot of mileage out of 'anti-endorsements' for the Republican healthcare bill from the American Medical Association (AMA) and American Association of Retired Persons (now known simply as AARP). In some reports, these developments are being treated as devastating blows -- as if the the organizations involved are the ultimate arbiters of expert, apolitical opinion from key constituencies: American doctors, and American seniors. But these groups are once again acting in a highly politicized manner.
Where Are Republican Leaders?
After finally winning control of the White House and both chambers of Congress, the GOP has proven gun-shy.

The House Republican conference has unveiled a health-care bill that pleases just about no one. Ross Douthat, writing in the New York Times on Wednesday, described the “American Health Care Act” this way: It’s a piece of legislation caught betwixt and between: It includes enough in the way of tax credits and regulation to be labeled “Obamacare lite” by the party’s would-be ideological enforcers, but it also promises to throw many people off the insurance rolls — many Trump voters included — for the sake of uncertain policy goals. . . . So it’s a bill that nobody on the right much likes: Not libertarians and not reformocons, not right-wing donors and not mushy moderates, not the Tea Party senators who promised full repeal and not the swing-state senators who well know that their own voters want the coverage expansion to endure. As for Americans who aren’t ideologically committed, forget about it: Passing the bill would be an invitation to a political beheading.
Obamacare Can’t Be Fixed
The moment Republicans bought into the notion that Obamacare must not just be repealed but "replaced," Democrats won. Democrats argue that health care is a "right." Republicans claim they disagree, that nowhere in the Constitution does the federal government guarantee health care treatment or health care insurance. But Republicans' behavior suggests otherwise.

President Donald Trump, for example, says that in replacing Obamacare no one should be worse off; that insurance companies cannot decline those with pre-existing medical conditions; that insurance carriers must allow parents to keep their "children" on their insurance plans until the age of 26; and that insurance companies cannot drop people under any circumstances. Polls show that these are the most popular features of Obamacare. But forcing an insurance company to cover people with pre-existing conditions completely destroys the concept of insurance. Insurance is about pooling groups of people whose premiums cover unknown risks, not known ones.
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